Atelier Arcay, Paris

Nicolas Chardon - Claude Closky - Thomas Lélu - Dimitri Mallet - François Morellet - Camilia Oliveira - Elsa Werth

But we can no longer stop there and confine this unique work to the privileged few.
On the contrary! We must work from it, recreate it in other functions, multiply it and project it into the world.

Arcay and re-creation by Vasarely In Art d’aujourd’hui, 1957

 

Painting is always both an image of something and of itself. It tells and shows itself through a subject. I chose the palette (which I never use), as a motif that symbolizes this return of an action (painting) upon itself. There’s irony in this choice, but also seriousness: it’s a way of exposing what’s going on, but without heroism. It’s a way of exposing what’s going on, but without heroism. But since I don’t use a palette, it’s a false image in a sense, but true, since the painting shows what it is and how it was made in a fairly straightforward way. The shapes of the painted palettes are close to the real palettes you’d find in a fine art store.
It’s also a way of using a painting subject, a fetish, a pop motif, sometimes reminiscent of other shapes (pizza, target, pokman…), a bit like a game.
September 6, 2021
Camila Oliveira Fairclough

 

Claude CLOSKY

1234, 2022
4 silkscreen prints on vellum paper 40 x 60 cm

This quadriptych challenges the authority of the image and the rhetoric of its exhibition. Composed of the same silkscreen repeated 4 times and presented in 4 opposite orientations. By alternating horizontality and verticality, up and down, left and right, we follow the order of things to better disrupt it. Moving forward and going in circles are equivalent.

 

Dimitri MALLET

Paysage 1, 2018 silkscreen on black paper 88 x 68 cm

can we remember what we see with our eyes closed in Sous les paupières, by Valérie Labayle, 2017.

 

Elsa WERTH

L’action cesse (…), 2018 silkscreen on conqueror paper 88 x 68 cm

Combining endgame phrases with disembodied abstract grids is a way of reinventing the geometric patterns that occur in art history.

 

Franck SCURTI

Lunettes d’Artiste Parisien, 2005 silkscreen on coated paper 38 x 49.5 cm

In fact, the terrace of the Café de Flore is a bit like the French art scene: everyone’s in their place and everyone’s looking at each other, but no one really sees each other.
in Sept à Sept , Éditions Jannink, Paris, 2005.

 

François MORELLET

40,000 squares, 1971 silkscreen on heavy paper 80 x 80 cm

Random distribution of 40,000 squares following the odd and even numbers of a telephone directory, 50% orange, 50% green.

 

Nicolas CHARDON

Surf, 2021
paper towel, ballpoint pen, frame 27 x 27 cm

The intoxication of the wave …

 

Thomas LÉLU

untitled, 2019
pigment inkjet and silkscreen on canvas mounted on stretcher 116 x 81 cm

Between voyeurism and sublimation, monochrome paint here both disfigures and sublimates the press image, transformed into an icon.

http://atelier-arcay.com

 

 

Thomas LÉLU

untitled (2019)
pigment inkjet and silkscreen on stretched canvas
116 x 81 cm
price upon request
Courtesy Arcay

Camila Oliveira

Fairclough "Achromatic Palettes" (2021)
silkscreen on recycled vellum paper
60 x 80 cm
landscape or portrait
price upon request
Courtesy Arcay

Claude CLOSKY

1234 (2022)
4 silkscreen prints on vellum paper
40 x 60 cm
price upon request
Courtesy Arcay

Dimitri MALLET

Paysage (2018)
silkscreen on black paper
88 x 68 cm
price upon request
Courtesy Arcay

Elsa WERTH

L'action cesse (2018)
silkscreen on conqueror paper
88 x 68 cm
price upon request
Courtesy Arcay

Franck SCURTI

Lunettes d’Artiste Parisien (2005)
screen-printed on both sides on coated paper
38 x 49,5 cm
price upon request
Courtesy Arcay

François MORELLET

40 000 carrés (1971)
silkscreen on heavy paper
80 x 80 cm
price upon request
Courtesy Arcay

Nicolas CHARDON

surf (2021)
paper napkin, ballpoint pen, picture frame
27 x 27 cm
price upon request
Courtesy Arcay